A Return to Learning as a Writer

I have a break from my day job as a teacher this week and have been filling it as a student of writing. And yes, it has been a thrilling week.

First, I am getting more involved with writing associations and, when they are cooking, writer Zooms are truly engaging. For example, readings from the Mystery Writers of America – New York and the Horror Writers Association – New York/Galactic Terrors killed this month. Witnessing writers perform their work is always a treat, but having them talk process afterwards delights both the writer and teacher in me.

Monthly meetings can be a mixed bag but I am learning to participate more and that improves with each round. Highly recommended.

I did learn about the Alliance of Independent Authors from this month’s MWA-NY meeting (thanks, Victoria Weisfeld), and it already seems to be a true resource after years of disappointments. It is difficult to wade through all the webinars, outright hustles, and “get successful quick” pitches flooding the market these days, and I am grateful to find more and more solid ground via these associations.

Writing is an ongoing education and multiple lessons can be learned with each activity. I am discovering which opinions are given sincerely and which are serving some other agenda, and how to benefit from both. I am seeing that sometimes improvements to a creative environment are more complicated and frustrating than the initial situation, and all of it teaches. We take what we need from each experience and we grow from there.

And there are ways to learn from masters and professionals further along than you. Associations have value, and they are numerous. Pay the dues and reap the benefits. MasterClass is worth the annual price. A curated list of podcasts can offer weekly instruction, information, and/or inspiration (which is exactly why I still mourn the suspension of regular episodes from The Horror Show with Braine Keene).

Similarly, curated social media platforms such as Twitter and Facebook can provide an important writing community to sustain you, offer support, advice, and growth. Unfollow the frivolous or overtly political and follow creatives who can inspire, educate, and whom you can support with likes and encouragement; it is an entirely different online experience than screaming into the doom and gloom. Additionally, YouTube has a growing list of reader/writer oriented shows to explore (I love the deeply philosophical analysis of pop culture on Implicitly Pretentious). And I am sure many can offer additional insights about shows, people to follow, and/or worthwhile platforms in the comments below.

My point is that while I have barely left the house this week, I have traveled extensively, witnessed many stories, gleaned useful information, saw many friends, learned so much, and was entertained often. It has been a refreshing week, and I am grateful.

So much is out there, brothers and sisters. Go get you some and use it to fuel your own creativity.

About chrisryanwrites

My name is Christopher Ryan. I am a former award-winning journalist turned high school teacher, and I have written since reading S.E. Hinton's THE OUTSIDERS when I was in elementary school. I have independently published an award-winning debut novel, CITY OF WOE, plus the prequel short story collection CITY OF SIN, the sequel novel CITY OF PAIN, a high school thriller novel GENIUS HIGH, and several high adventure novelettes for the Rapid Reads series featuring Alex Simmons' African-American adventurer BLACKJACK All are available via amazon.com, as is my children's book, THE FERGUSON FILES - THE MYSTERY SPOT. Additionally, I was nominated for a supporting actor award for my work in the multiple award-winning independent film, CLANDESTINE, from Feenix Films. I blog about writing, life, pop culture, the journey of learning to promote my independently published work, my efforts to secure a traditional publishing contract, and my career as a teacher.
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1 Response to A Return to Learning as a Writer

  1. Mo Britt says:

    Chris, thanks for the reminder that there are many paths, and many teachers. I am happy to hear about many other resources for writers looking to learn. Thanks, Maureen

    Like

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